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20130422
20130422
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
of understanding and feeling comfortable with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a bu
. the technology network in san jose who made this a crucial project. i want to call out a thanks to or tactical team. we know how to make it small, not over 150 feet in the air. we have a studio, zone engineering and i have to say thanks to hmr who has been a rock star and directly one of the reasons this is happening. an extremely talented project. thank you all. i also want to just take a moment to really acknowledge that while leo and i have done a lot of things m in this world, we would not be able to do it alone. there is only one person responsible for this project and that is executive director of the arts. luminarias. i can go on and on. i think i will throughout the night. do know that she's a special person and this entire community owes her a debt of gratitude. i want to thank leo and his family for bringing the level of artistic integrity for this work that somehow slipped through the progress of a work of contemporary art parallel in art history. it has everything to do with leo and our interpretations with our discussion and that one minute that transformed how people will be rec
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
of a building should grow from characteristics of each project such as location, construction technology and a purpose. the tower is a marvelous expression of mr. pally's -- commitment. please welcome cesar pally. [ applause ] >> this is a very important day for me today. i have been dreaming about this tower and the center for over 6 years. now, this is all going to be reality. i hope not for long we'll all gather here to celebrate the opening of the tower and the center. i have always loved san francisco. it's an incredible city. it's dynamic at the same time, it's gentle, it's an incredible place. we have designed the tower appropriate for this city. the tower will be a dynamic, elegant and very gracious. it will be building appropriate tower for this great city. now that it seems to be the tallest tower, but west of the mississippi, what a marvelous marker for this place. when you see it as a distance, this tower, you will know that the center is at it's space. when you arrive in san francisco from los angeles or san diego, you will be in this tower. so it's a marvelous combination t
, oftentimes when you talk to the employees of all the technology companies that i have been talking with every week and ask them what draws their talent to a city, the first three things they know whether it's public transportation, it's also the arts. because that's what keeps their creative mind functioning. and it's these institutions with their wonderful service and their continuing exhibitions, world renown exhibitions that introduce and keep their minds active and keeps the tremendous amounts of visitors coming to our city. i know how difficult it has been for board and for the president to make quick search, to matchup the right person with such an incredible institution as these are. i for one, know how difficult it is and when you are trying to do that when you are running government, i want to also say to the staff that i enjoyed mr. buchannon's leadershipa as much as you do, to fill those shoes with mr. bailey i'm excited because i trust the board of trustees, the time you took to select him, i'm going to welcome mr. bailey and look forward to and excited to do it. this city is on s
it wasn't just the fire department alone. it took a lot of work from the department of technology to the department of city planning, i saw brian strong here early and ken rich from the mayor's office. a whole host of people, and we have john green who is our department captain, who earlier this morning gave a very special blessing upstairs in the dining facility to all the members at station 1 and for blessing this building and all the work done here. few other folks that i would like to acknowledge, local 798, the men and women presented by tom o'connor behind me, thank you, tom. as well as some of his members of the executive board here, thanks very much to local 798. there is two retired deputies here. i have seen this happen. i'm grateful they came back because it's this early phase, he got us where we are at today. thank you very much. [ applause ] and also retired deputy chief of operation patrick guard who was a member of station one 1 gaevend us -- gave us a lot of input. most of my command staff is behind me. just like when you go out and run a call you count on each ot
and that will be live google plus streamed. all sorts of fun technology. but before the publication of her book, and the subsequent film, this was probably one of the most famous compositions by verm ere, certainly the most famous, and has three paintings and i love that the way that the clouds hang so low and it is actually much darker on my screen, but this kind of balance between the rain clouds and the white pufffy clouds and the way that they interacts with the buildings in the city. this competes with two other paintings in the exhibition and i will not say which ones they are and it competes for my favorite painting in the exhibition it is view of harlem with bleaching grounds in the foregrounds and one of the most important innovations for the 17th century, dutch landscape painters was the way that they approached the sky. for any of you who have traveled to the netherlands you know that there is a low horizon line and i have been told that the dutch people and i can be corrected. that they call their clouds the dutch mountains because the landscape is so low that really you get these m
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
of electronic technology, we're going to see more and more need for electronic health records. hit systems are going to be a godsend for our profession. being able to share that, that demographic information and treatment plans and progress notes is going to be very important to help that person move quicker in their recovery and get more comprehensive recovery. if a recovering person can find employment early on in their recovery, it lends self-value. it helps a person's self-image to feel gainfully employed. i like to tell employers, when i do employer training, that the thing about people in recovery is that you know what their issue is. you don't have to guess. i believe it's very important to the person in recovery, for a sense of self-responsibility and human dignity, and for the employer, in seeing that he has a workforce that's largely untapped, that's willing to work and will be loyal to the employer. the reason why i got into this profession is because of my family history. in my own recovery, i started using before the age of 10, and had a lot of medical issues as a result of ea
improve these systems, you need to deploy the latest technology. woman: the pipe bursting process is designed to replace an old pipe without digging an entire trench. the old pipe has cracks and displaced joints and openings in it. we try to stop, not only infiltration, but exfiltration, where sewage would actually leak out of the pipe. the head is larger, so it breaks away the old pipe and allows the new pipe to come in behind it. griffin: we are saving about 67% of the cost of actually digging old pipe up. clyne: it's less invasive than an open-cut process, where you would open the whole trench up and replace the pipe. it's called "trenchless" technology, so... that's as good as it gets. griffin: we don't have to dig up everyone's yard, and we refurbish that pipe at a much-reduced cost. another technique, the cured-in-place lining. it's equivalent to putting a large sock through the existing sewer. we form a new pipe inside the old pipe, and therefore we seal up all of the defects that allow rainwater to come in. hunter: we repair about 730 leaks a month in our system. griffin:
scared of them at first. the technology was a little heywire in the beginning -- haywire in the beginning. they could go very fast, but people thought they were too dangerous. but eventually trolley cars starting taking over. and in the early 1890's, the railway company started buying up transit companies across the city. wherever they could, they tried to replace the old forms of technology, horse cars and cable cars, with these cheaper, more energy-efficient electric trolley cars. the question was what to do with all the old cars. they had an idea. they took an ad out in the paper. they said the market street railway had all of these old cars. you could buy one without seats for $10 or with seats for $20. they had some suggestions with what people could do with the old horse cars and cable cars. they could be used for news stands, fruit stands, lunch stands, play houses, poultry houses, tool houses, coal sheds, conservatories and polling booths, etc. and it really is a testament to the market street railway's imagination that these cars essentially got used for all of these different pu
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)